The New Yorker‘s Emily Nussbaum wrote a great piece about the underrated It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia:

“Always Sunny” isn’t always so self-referential: while it cannibalizes genres, it doesn’t have the abstraction of, say, NBC’s “Community.” But there was something cathartic about seeing the show address, with pride and self-loathing, its own unwillingness to be easily loved. It’s not as if dark shows can’t be popular: “Seinfeld” was a hit, after all. Yet, as impressive as “Seinfeld” was, it had no muck in it. It was icy and calculated, with its anger banked. In part, this was because of who the members of the “Seinfeld” gang were: educated Manhattanites with safety nets. In contrast, the “Always Sunny” characters are gutter punks—mostly Irish-Catholic drunks, although the twins grew up rich, with a Nazi grandfather—with no skills, intractable addictions, terrible families, and little capacity to get anywhere except the Jersey Shore, where they end up fighting over a “rum ham.” They’re not fun drunks: they’re scary, sad ones.